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Future infrastructure plans for Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council outlined by NI Water

18 November 2020 13:20


NI Water attended Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council recently, to update representatives on infrastructure plans going forward and the level of investment needed for the Council area.

In its future growth plans, Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council has identified, that by 2032, it will need up to 13,500 new houses, predominantly in Lisburn City, the greater urban areas of Lisburn and Castlereagh and the towns of Carryduff, Hillsborough and Moira and key employment areas will be Blaris, Purdysburn, Knockmore, Derriaghy, Dundonald, Carryduff and Newtownbreda.

In this context, NI Water’s Head of Investment Management, Stephen Blockwell, set out the funding situation facing NI Water:

“The level to which NI Water can invest in its infrastructure is not the result of the company’s commercials and finances; rather it is set according to what the Executive decides to allocate to NI Water from within its annual Northern Ireland Capital budget and for many years the Executive has not allocated what has been needed. There is no additional capability for increased investment outside of this mechanism and no other Water Utility in the UK is required to operate in this way.

“Due to this historical under-investment, major parts of our cities and over 100 towns across Northern Ireland currently have little or no capacity left in their sewer and wastewater systems. 

“For Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council, this could lead to a significant impact on the Council’s growth plans.  New housing developments and employment opportunities have been identified. However, without adequate sewer networks and upgrades to Wastewater Treatment Works, much of this development and economic growth may not be able to happen.

“Our infrastructure plans over the 2021 – 27 period (known as PC21) for the Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council area, if adequately funded, will begin to make inroads into addressing the sewer and wastewater capacity issues currently hindering new housing and business development. However, it will likely take sustained future investment over at least 2 Price Controls to address these issues.”

Dr Blockwell concluded:   

“Significant and sustained investment is needed for wastewater and water infrastructure across Northern Ireland. NI Water knows all of the Councils’ growth ambitions, we know what needs done in each Council area and we have the plan and the skills to deliver it. However, the Executive needs to allocate adequate levels of capital investment to NI Water. If future levels of capital investment continue at historic or current levels there will be significant constraints on economic growth, damage to the environment and risk to people’s health.”

A number of slides and maps showing current sewer and wastewater issues and proposed investment in Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council were presented at the Council meeting.

Further information can be found on our website www.niwater.com/wastewater-capacity/



ENDS//



Notes to Editors:

  • The Utility Regulator has published its draft determination of what it believes Northern Ireland Water should deliver in both levels of service and capital programmes during the next six years from 2021 to 2027. The Regulator’s draft determination also stipulates the level of costs and finance required to be invested by Northern Ireland Water’s shareholder, the Department for Infrastructure, on behalf of the Assembly Executive over the next six years, beginning in April 2021  

  • Business Plan Fast Read is available to view: click here

  • Examples of risks to people’s health includes: risks associated with overflows from manholes into public highways or gardens, driveways; high frequency of discharges from sewers reaching the sea. This could affect blue flag status and potentially lead to increased infections such as ear infections for surfers and swimmers.

For further information, please contact NI Water’s Press Office email Press.office@niwater.com


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